OpenFiction [Blog]

MIT Professor Shigeru Miyagawa named award recipient by the OCW Consortium

Professor Miyagawa recognized with other leaders of the global OpenCourseWare movement.

Shigeru Miyagawa

Professor Miyagawa

CAMBRIDGE, MA, March 22, 2012 — MIT Linguistics professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been selected to receive the President’s Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE) for his contributions to the global OpenCourseWare and Open Education movements. Professor Miyagawa has been a key member of the faculty team that has nurtured the development of MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW), has contributed a significant amount of his own course materials to the site, and has traveled extensively to spread the practice of openly sharing educational materials globally.

“I am honored and deeply humbled by this recognition,” remarked Professor Miyagawa. “MIT OpenCourseWare and the many other projects around the world are the result of the generosity of thousands of educators who have shared their teaching materials, and all deserve to be recognized. I am glad to have helped to make this sharing possible.”

Professor Miyagawa, who holds the endowed Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture chair, served on the committee that proposed MIT OpenCourseWare in the year 2000. Since the program’s inception, he has been a member of the MIT OpenCourseWare Faculty Advisory Committee, and he currently serves as chair of that body.

When OCW published its proof-of-concept site in the fall of 2002, Professor Miyagawa contributed materials from two courses, CMS.930 Media, Education and the Marketplace and 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language. In the following year he contributed materials from 24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax and 21F.027 Visualizing Cultures, one of the richest and most visually engaging of MIT OpenCourseWare’s offerings.

Professor Miyagawa has also been a tireless advocate for the global OpenCourseWare movement. In 2005, he provided assistance to six of Japan’s top universities in forming the Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, which has since grown to include 24 Japanese universities and 20 associated organizations. In support of the global movement, Professor Miyagawa has traveled to locations including Cameroon, Korea, Portugal, Israel, Taiwan, and Zambia to advocate to for the creation of OpenCourseWare programs at universities around the world.

Honored with Professor Miyagawa by the OCW Consortium are Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan from University of California, Irvine and José Vida Fernández of University Carlos III of Madrid. Chair for the Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention, Program in Public Health, Dr. Ogunseitan is the recipient of the OpenCourseWare Consortium’s Leadership ACE for his role in building the prominence of the UCI OCW site within that institution. Professor for the Department of Public Law and Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III, Dr. Vida has been awarded the Educator Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence in recognition of the outstanding body of content he has published through that university’s OCW site.

The Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence provide annual recognition to outstanding individuals, courseware and OpenCourseWare sites in the OCW Consortium community. The awards are presented each year at the global OpenCourseWare Consortium’s annual conference, to be held this year April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK. The Consortium’s Board of Directors selects individual award recipients; an awards committee populated from the Consortium membership selects site and course awards. The Educator ACE was previously given to MIT physics professor Walter Lewin in 2011.

“We’re very pleased to honor these three individuals,” said OCW Consortium Executive Director Mary Lou Forward. “Each of these recipients embodies the commitment widely shared throughout the OCW community, and each has made a remarkable contribution.”

The OCW Consortium Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence are sponsored by KNEXT, an education software and solutions provider that focuses on learning assessment, ePortfolio development and higher education advisory services.

About the Award Recipients

Professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been at MIT since 1991, where he is Professor of Linguistics and holds the endowed chair, Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture. In linguistics, he has published numerous books and monographs, and has nearly fifty articles on syntax, argument structure, and East Asian and Altaic linguistics. He also runs a laboratory that creates interactive educational programs. JP NET, which has the entire MIT Japanese program on the web, was one of the first online projects in the world to place an entire academic program on the Internet (1993-1994). Visualizing Cultures, in collaboration with the Pulitzer Prize historian John W. Dower, has been recognized by the National Endowment for the Humanities as an outstanding humanities educational website. He was on the original team that proposed OpenCourseWare, and has helped to start opencoursewares in Japan and elsewhere. He serves on the MIT OpenCourseWare Advisory Board. Miyagawa received his Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Arizona in 1980, and his B.A. from the International Christian University in Tokyo in 1975.

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan is professor of public health and founding Chair of the department of Population Health and Disease Prevention at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also professor of Social Ecology. Since 2009, he has served as the Co-Director of the UC Irvine Framework Program in Global Health funded by the National Institutes of Health’s John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences. He is the Director of Research Education, Training and Career Development for the NIH- funded Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He is a member of the steering committee for the UC Irvine Environment Institute and he serves on the executive committee for the Urban Water Research Center. He earned his doctorate in microbiology at the university of Tennessee, and his Master of Public Health at the university of California, Berkeley, where he also earned a certificate in International Health. He is the author of Microbial Diversity (Blackwell-Wiley, 2005) and editor of Green Health (Sage, 2011).

Professor José Vida Fernández graduated magna cum laude from University of Granada (Spain). He is also European PhD from the University of Bologna (Italy). He is a noted legal scholar on telecommunications law, health care law, poverty and welfare state. Vida teaches administrative law at the University Carlos III of Madrid and has lectured abroad (US, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Perú). He is Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III and fellow of the Institute Pascual Madoz (University Carlos III) and Residential Scholar at the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study. Prof. Vida has broad research experience as director of public and private funded projects. He has also received awards from Spanish and international organizations for innovative teaching projects and OpenCourseWare publications (University Carlos III, 2007; Universia, 2010; OCW Consortium, 2011).

About KNEXT

KNEXT, which is part of Kaplan, is an education software and solutions company focused on helping higher education institutions build or enhance prior learning assessment offerings and online portfolio management. By enabling individuals to translate their prior learning into college credit and track their progress through online portfolios, KNEXT helps institutions recruit engaged adult learners and increase both persistence and graduation rates. For information about KNEXT, the Learning Recognition Program, self-assessment quizzes, the PATH courses, and more, visit http://www.knext.com.

About the OpenCourseWare Consortium

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 250 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses.

Activities of the OpenCourseWare Consortium are supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, member dues, and contributions from sustaining members including: African Virtual University, China Open Resources for Education, Delft University of Technology, Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NetEase Information Technology, Open Universiteit, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Tufts University, Universia, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University of California, Irvine, University of Michigan, and University of the Western Cape.

Contact:
Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu
http://ocw.mit.edu

OCW Consortium announces 2012 winners of individual Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence

Individual awards announced; site and course awards to follow.

CAMBRIDGE, MA, March 22, 2012 — The OpenCourseWare Consortium has announced the 2012 winners of individual Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE).

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan, University of California, Irvine Professor and Chair for the Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention, Program in Public Health, is the recipient of this year’s Leadership ACE for his role in building the prominence of the UCI OCW site within that institution.

José Vida Fernández, University Carlos III of Madrid Professor for the Department of Public Law and Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III, is the 2012 recipient of the Educator ACE in recognition of the outstanding body of content he has published through that university’s OCW site.

MIT professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been awarded the President’s Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence for his leadership in developing MIT OpenCourseWare and his pivotal role in fostering the growth of OCW in Japan and around the world.

The Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence provide annual recognition to outstanding individuals, courseware and OpenCourseWare sites in the OCW Consortium community. The awards are presented each year at the global OpenCourseWare Consortium’s annual conference, to be held this year April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK. The Consortium’s Board of Directors selects individual award recipients; an awards committee populated from the Consortium membership selects site and course awards. Site ACE’s will be announced later in March and ACE’s for individual courses will be announced at the OCWC Conference.

“We’re very pleased to honor these three individuals,” said OCW Consortium Executive Director Mary Lou Forward. “Each of these recipients embodies the commitment widely shared throughout the OCW community, and each has made a remarkable contribution.”

The OCW Consortium Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence are sponsored by KNEXT, an education software and solutions provider that focuses on learning assessment, ePortfolio development and higher education advisory services.

About the Award Recipients

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan is professor of public health and founding Chair of the department of Population Health and Disease Prevention at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also professor of Social Ecology. Since 2009, he has served as the Co-Director of the UC Irvine Framework Program in Global Health funded by the National Institutes of Health’s John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences. He is the Director of Research Education, Training and Career Development for the NIH- funded Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He is a member of the steering committee for the UC Irvine Environment Institute and he serves on the executive committee for the Urban Water Research Center. He earned his doctorate in microbiology at the university of Tennessee, and his Master of Public Health at the university of California, Berkeley, where he also earned a certificate in International Health. He is the author of Microbial Diversity (Blackwell-Wiley, 2005) and editor of Green Health (Sage, 2011).

Professor José Vida Fernández
graduated magna cum laude from University of Granada (Spain). He is also European PhD from the University of Bologna (Italy). He is a noted legal scholar on telecommunications law, health care law, poverty and welfare state. Vida teaches administrative law at the University Carlos III of Madrid, and has lectured abroad (US, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Perú). He is Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III and fellow of the Institute Pascual Madoz (University Carlos III) and Residential Scholar at the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study. Prof. Vida has broad research experience as director of public and private funded projects. He has also received awards from Spanish and international organizations for innovative teaching projects and OpenCourseWare publications (University Carlos III, 2007; Universia, 2010; OCW Consortium, 2011).

Shigeru Miyagawa has been at MIT since 1991, where he is Professor of Linguistics and holds the endowed chair, Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture. In linguistics, he has published numerous books and monographs, and has nearly fifty articles on syntax, argument structure, and East Asian and Altaic linguistics. He also runs a laboratory that creates interactive educational programs. JP NET, which has the entire MIT Japanese program on the web, was one of the first online projects in the world to place an entire academic program on the Internet (1993-1994). Visualizing Cultures, in collaboration with the Pulitzer Prize historian John W. Dower, has been recognized by the National Endowment for the Humanities as an outstanding humanities educational website. He was on the original team that proposed OpenCourseWare, and has helped to start opencoursewares in Japan and elsewhere. He serves on the MIT OpenCourseWare Advisory Board. Miyagawa received his Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Arizona in 1980, and his B.A. from the International Christian University in Tokyo in 1975.

About KNEXT

KNEXT, which is part of Kaplan, is an education software and solutions company focused on helping higher education institutions build or enhance prior learning assessment offerings and online portfolio management. By enabling individuals to translate their prior learning into college credit and track their progress through online portfolios, KNEXT helps institutions recruit engaged adult learners and increase both persistence and graduation rates. For information about KNEXT, the Learning Recognition Program, self-assessment quizzes, the PATH courses, and more, visit http://www.knext.com.

About the OpenCourseWare Consortium

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 250 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses.

Activities of the OpenCourseWare Consortium are supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, member dues, and contributions from sustaining members including: African Virtual University, China Open Resources for Education, Delft University of Technology, Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NetEase Information Technology, Open Universiteit, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Tufts University, Universia, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University of California, Irvine, University of Michigan, and University of the Western Cape.

Contact:
Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu

http://ocw.mit.edu

Asia rising in the OCW world

At the Asian OCW/Open Education Regional Conference (AROOC) 2011.  It’s clear that Asia is moving into the fore of OCW publication.  OCW in Asia is more widespread than anywhere else in the world, with 213 institutions sharing more than 3,500 courses.

Members of the Japan OCW Consortium and participants in the Korea OCW program have each published more than 1,000 courses each, and members of the Taiwan OCW Consortium have published around 450 courses, three quarters of which include video lectures.

Even more impressive is the way that these univerisites are beginning to leverage the open content they’ve created to reimagine how they provide campus-based education, experimenting with inverted classrooms, tuition reduction, and student generation of content.

This information is drawn from presentations that will be available via streaming media soon.  I’ll post a link when I have it.

View the last Awards for OCW Excellence

2012 Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence call for nominations

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is pleased to announce the call for nominations for the second annual Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE). The OCW ACE’s will be presented at the next global OpenCourseWare Consortium meeting in Cambridge, U.K., April 16-18, 2012.

The Awards or OpenCourseWare Excellence recognize outstanding individual contributions to the OCW/OER movement, exemplary OCW member sites and excellent individual course presentations. A panel of voting members will select ACE site and course winners from finalists culled by the award committee. Individual winners will be selected by a vote of the board of directors.

Nominations for individuals, sites and courses will be accepted through January 13, 2012 and may be submitted through the following page (http://ocwconsortium.org/ace) or by e-mailing ace@ocwconsortium.org. Nominations for sites and courses are encouraged to be submitted as two-minute video/screen capture tours of the relevant content. Visit the above web page for complete information on preliminary criteria, rules and eligibility.

The OCWC is seeking volunteers to serve on the ACE Committee to refine award criteria and select award finalists. The Consortium is also seeking a sponsor for the awards ceremony at the upcoming Consortium meeting.

OCWC 2012 Call for Papers

The OpenCourseWare Consortium and the Support Centre for Open Resources in Education (SCORE) of The Open University in the UK invite session proposals for their combined 2012 global conference, Innovation and Impact: Openly collaborating to enhance education. The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a worldwide community of universities and organizations committed to open sharing in post-secondary education by advancing OpenCourseWare and its impact on global education. SCORE is funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England and its mission is to work with the UK Higher Education sector to realise the benefits of Open Educational Resources in all aspects of academic life.

We encourage submissions for sessions that highlight developments in open education through the use of OpenCourseWare, summarize research on open learning, showcase best academic practices through the use of Open Educational Resources, discuss innovative approaches to open sharing, and encourage deep thinking about the future of the OpenCourseWare and Open Educational Resources movement for educational systems around the world.

Conference Themes

Innovation
The role of open technologies in encouraging sharing and reuse of open content
Methods for researching and evaluating open academic practices
Ways in which people can be trained to utilise open content more effectively

Impact
How OCW/OER are changing the practices of teachers
The impact that OCW/OER is having on formal and informal learners
How institutional or governmental policies are supporting the open education movement

Collaboration
Ways in which educational institutions are effectively working together around open content
How educational institutions are working on open content with both commercial and not-for-profit organisations
How educational institutions are working on open content with professional bodies and employer associations.

Timeline
Submissions Due: December 1, 2011
Acceptance Announcements: Week of January 2, 2012
Speaker Registration Deadline: February 27, 2012
Final Papers Due: March 1, 2012

You can submit the proposal at http://conference.ocwconsortium.org.

Also, deadline for the call for proposals to host OCWC Global Meeting 2013 is extended to October 31st. You can find more information and more information at http://www.ocwconsortium.org/en/community/conferencesiteselection.

How it all began (the retrospective edition)

Here is the video of one of my all-time favorite OCW experiences–the panel I moderated at OCWC 2011 of many of the principals involved in MIT’s decision to undertake OCW. It’s been a pleasure and an honor to get to know each one of these gentlemen and see first hand the collective commitment among them to simple do good in the world.

Call for Participation: 2012 Awards for OpenCourseWare Committee

Posted in Consortium Meetings, OpenCourseWare, OpenCourseWare Consortium by scarsonmsm on September 19, 2011

Also posted on the OCW Consortium blog.

The 2012 Awards for OpenCourseWare (ACE) Committee is seeking members to help refine the program for its second year and to judge nominees for the awards to presented at the 2012 Global OpenCourseWare Consortium Meeting April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK.

The ACEs honor individuals, OCW sites and individual courses that have made significant contributions to the OCW movement. In October of this year the ACE Committee will re-examine the process used to confer last year’s awards and set the process for this year. Nominations are expected to be accepted in November and December of this year, and ACE Committee members will participate in selection of winners during the spring months.

The Committee is seeking participants that will provide the broadest possible representation of Consortium membership, and especially welcomes individuals fluent in multiple languages. To volunteer for the ACE Committee, please register for the ACE mailing list here.

From MIT President Susan Hockfield’s Welcome to OCWC 2011

We were very pleased to have MIT President Susan Hockfield provide the official welcome from the hosting institutions at the 2011 Global OpenCourseWare Consortium Conference on May 4. Though we’ll eventually have video of the event, including her welcome, I thought I’d share an excerpt from her remarks here as well.

Over the last 10 years, MIT OpenCourseWare has had a tremendous impact on MIT itself, transforming the way we connect with students and alumni, the way we think about teaching and learning, and the way we understand our role in the world. I expect this is true for all of you, too: as the movement has taken off, we have come to see how OCW and open sharing have magnified many times over our power to contribute to global education. The worldwide embrace of MIT OpenCourseWare continues to be incredibly gratifying. Students and faculty from more than 3,000 universities around the world have visited the MIT site alone, as have many millions of independent learners from around the globe. We receive moving e-mails from users describing how MIT OpenCourseWare has unlocked the doors to new worlds for them.

And the doors keep opening, everywhere, as more and more universities join the movement, bringing their own unique approaches to education. Part of the Consortium’s story can be told in numbers: The Consortium now includes more than 250 universities and organizations, representing 45 countries and regions around the world. Collectively, Consortium members have published more than 15,000 courses. These courses are published or translated in 12 languages, including Catalan, Chinese, English, Hebrew, Japanese, Spanish, Turkish and Vietnamese. National governments of at least five countries now have policies on the development and use of open educational resources. And now some numbers that speak to the superb quality of the movement: in the latest US News ranking of the top 25 global universities, nine have an OpenCourseWare or open educational resources program; 15 of the top 50 do.

Another potent aspect of the OCW Consortium story is the global leadership and cooperation its members demonstrate every day. The Consortium counts among its members such well-known institutions as Oxford, UC Berkeley, the University of Tokyo and Seoul National University, working hand in hand with schools as diverse as the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, the Virtual University of Pakistan, and Utah Valley University. The Consortium’s board of directors draws its members from Japan, South Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, South Africa and the United States. Perhaps most important, the Consortium’s success springs from the many thousands of educators around the world—from across cultures and continents—who have embraced the importance of knowledge as a public good and have chosen to freely share their intellectual resources.

No idea, no matter how revolutionary, emerges without precedent. By the year 2000, many forces stirring in the young Internet inclined toward increasing openness, from open source software to open licensing, and MIT OpenCourseWare certainly drew strength and inspiration from them. However, I believe OpenCourseWare is properly the child of a much more ancient tradition, as well: For as long as the Western world has had universities, a defining feature of the academy has been the simultaneous pursuit of the same ideas, around the globe, and the drive to come together around those ideas. In a world too often fractured by conflict, this tradition of the “global intellectual commons” represents an important convening force for humankind, and a potent force for unified global action and the advancement of the common good. If we nurture the global intellectual commons, by reaching out to work with collaborators around the world to share our knowledge freely, and if we prepare our students to appreciate the value of this remarkable tradition, so beautifully embodied by the OCW Consortium, we will go a long way towards inventing a better future for all.

Once I get all my neglected items back under control, I’ll probably have some additional reflections on what was a remarkably successful event (if I do say so myself). Much of that success is due to the efforts of Brandon Muramatsu and the rest of the conference committee, who devoted a ton of time to the planning and execution. Thanks to all.

Register early, register often: OCWC 2011 May 4-6

Celebrating 10 Years of OCWOk, you only need to register once. But make sure you do it. Representatives of 200+ OpenCourseWares from around the world. Tim O’Reilly as keynote speaker. A panel including key participants in the establishment of MIT OpenCourseWare. Looking back at ten years, looking forward to the next ten. All right here on the MIT campus. Don’t miss it! Early registration through March 25th.

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