OpenFiction [Blog]

Another (less profound) transition

Posted in MIT OpenCourseWare, open education, OpenCourseWare, OpenCourseWare Consortium by scarsonmsm on March 4, 2014

As I move to a new professional chapter in my life, I am also moving to a new blogging home, and retiring OpenFiction.  Please follow my (probably occasional) bloggings about my new professional efforts on my new blog.

A professional transition

With profound gratitude for the opportunities I’ve been given at MIT, I want to share that I have accepted a new position as Operations Director for the OPENPediatrics program at Boston Children’s Hospital.  My last day at MIT will be March 31st.

I’ve always felt that my work at OCW might be a once in a lifetime opportunity to make a profound difference in the lives of people worldwide, and I am humbled to have found another opportunity to have such an impact.  Every year, more than 10 million children die of preventable causes, and OPENPediatrics (http://openpediatrics.org) seeks to address this challenge using the principles of open sharing and scalable education that animate OCW and MITx to improve the care of critically ill children on a global scale.

While I am excited by this new opportunity, I am sad to part ways with the many friends and colleagues who mean so much to me.  I will spend much of the next few years wondering (and maybe occasionally even asking) how the ODL and OCWC teams would have handled situations I will face.

I’m also sad to be unable to join my MIT colleagues in the engaging work that awaits ODL in the next few years.  Amid the uncertainty of the shifting higher education landscape and the organizational changes at MIT, I have total confidence in the amazing people brought together under the ODL banner.  I have no doubt that they will all do as they have always done–transform the way we think about the intersection of education and digital technologies, and how it can be used to make ours a better world.

I’m optimistic my new position will allow me to remain engaged in the open education community, and will regardless keep in touch with my friends at MIT and the OCWC.  Thank you again to the friends and colleagues who have made my work at OCW, the OCW Consortium, and the Office of Digital Learning such a wonderful experience.

MIT OpenCourseWare Releases Episode 1 of ChemLab Boot Camp Series

Videos follow 14 MIT freshmen through their introduction to hands-on science.

CAMBRIDGE, MA, September 18, 2012 — MIT OpenCourseWare has released the first episode of its newest open educational offering, ChemLab Boot Camp, a video series that chronicles the experiences of 14 real MIT freshmen as they get their first taste of working in MIT chemistry labs.

Each year, groups of MIT freshmen are introduced to MIT’s laboratory environment through a four-week January course called 5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques. In January 2012, a film crew followed these students as they competed to complete experiments. The stakes in the class are high—students who pass the class are guaranteed a job in an MIT research lab.

Watch Episode 1 of ChemLab Boot Camp.

Ten additional episodes will be released each week through the fall, and announced on the ChemLab Boot Camp e-mail list. The 2-5 minute episodes, shot in a style that mixes the geek fun of open educational resources with the immediacy of reality TV, brings viewers closer to the experience of being an MIT student than ever before. Follow the students as they struggle to master the intricacies of working with solvents and compete to create the largest crystals. The videos are part of a broader effort funded by The Dow Chemical Company to foster interest in science and engineering careers.

“Despite the critical need for more and more people trained in chemistry and chemical engineering, the fields have not been as attractive as they should be,” said MIT Professor John Essigmann in commenting on the inspiration for the series. “Dow and MIT have mobilized our collective resources to try to show high school and college students what it is like to be a chemist. We hope to show the human side of our field and to inspire young people to want to become the next generation of chemists.”

The MIT-Dow Outreach Fund is designed to develop and support the science and engineering careers of underrepresented minorities and women. A five-year, $2 million commitment from The Dow Chemical Company, the fund supports the advancement of the shared goals of both Dow and MIT to support science education throughout the entire pipeline. The establishment of this Outreach Program comes as MIT celebrates its 150th anniversary.

About Dow

Dow (NYSE: DOW) combines the power of science and technology to passionately innovate what is essential to human progress. The Company connects chemistry and innovation with the principles of sustainability to help address many of the world’s most challenging problems such as the need for clean water, renewable energy generation and conservation, and increasing agricultural productivity. Dow’s diversified industry-leading portfolio of specialty chemical, advanced materials, agrosciences and plastics businesses delivers a broad range of technology-based products and solutions to customers in approximately 160 countries and in high growth sectors such as electronics, water, energy, coatings and agriculture. In 2011, Dow had annual sales of $60 billion and employed approximately 52,000 people worldwide. The Company’s more than 5,000 products are manufactured at 197 sites in 36 countries across the globe. References to “Dow” or the “Company” mean The Dow Chemical Company and its consolidated subsidiaries unless otherwise expressly noted. More information about Dow can be found at www.dow.com.

About Highlights for High School

Highlights for High School organizes more than 70 introductory level courses from the OCW site, and indexes over 2,700 individual resources to the AP curricula for calculus, chemistry, physics and biology, helping United States AP students and educators to find resources quickly. Highlights also includes dozens of demonstrations, competitions and other activities from MIT classes that show how fun and challenging science and technology subjects can be, inspiring the next generation of US engineers and scientists.

About MIT OpenCourseWare

MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of substantially all of MIT’s undergraduate and graduate courses—more than 2,100 in all—available on the Web, free of charge, to any user in the world. OCW receives an average of 1.75 million web site visits per month from more than 215 countries and territories worldwide. To date, more than 100 million individuals have accessed OCW materials.

Contact:

Christine Welch
Echo Media
(714) 573-0899 ext. 225
Christine@echomediapr.com

Introduction to Psychology Now Available in MIT OpenCourseWare’s Innovative OCW Scholar Format

Introduction to Psychology is the 6th of seven courses OCW will publish this year specifically to meet the needs of independent learners.

CAMBRIDGE, MA, July 31, 2012 — MIT OpenCourseWare has released a new version of 9.00 Introduction to Psychology in the innovative OCW Scholar format designed for independent learners. This course presents a scientific overview of how the mind works, and applies that knowledge to contemporary debates around topics like nature versus nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, the self, and society.

“I hope site visitors come away with an appreciation of just how amazing people are,” says Professor John Gabrieli, who developed the course. “I hope the course makes you think about yourself and your friends in a different way than you ever did before.”

Gabrieli, a renowned expert in the field of learning and memory, has used brain imaging technology combined with behavioral testing to map abstract concepts like memory, thought, and emotion to specific regions of the brain. Gabrieli’s research has significantly advanced our understanding of how learning and memory are organized in the mind. Some of his most recent research has provided insights into key aspects of autism, dyslexia, and visual memory. Gabrieli has also received numerous awards for his teaching, including the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford University in 2001.

MIT’s original version of 9.00 Introduction to Psychology from 2004 has received more than 650,000 visits. The new Scholar version provides visitors to the OCW site with an even more robust learning experience.

OCW Scholar courses represent a new approach to OCW publication. MIT faculty, staff and students work closely with the OCW team to structure the course materials for independent learners. These courses offer more materials than typical OCW courses and include new custom-created content. The Introduction to Psychology course provides a complete learning experience for independent learners, including lecture videos, reading assignments from a free online textbook and detailed notes from another book, interactive quizzes for each session, discussion content to elaborate key concepts, online resources for further study, review questions, and exams with solution keys.

The first five of a planned 15 OCW Scholar courses were launched by MIT OpenCourseWare in January 2011, and have collectively received more than 800,000 visits in less than a year. The initial OCW Scholar courses included Classical Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, Solid State Chemistry, Single Variable Calculus, and Multivariable Calculus.

Seven OCW Scholar courses were published in 2012. Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Principles of Microeconomics, and Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science were published earlier this year. Fundamentals of Biology, Introduction to Psychology, and Introduction to Computer Science and Programming were published this past month. OCW Scholar courses are published on the OCW site with the support of the Stanton Foundation.

About MIT OpenCourseWare

MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in teaching most of MIT’s undergraduate and graduate courses—more than 2,100 in all—available on the Web, free of charge, to any user in the world. OCW receives an average of 1.75 million web site visits per month from more than 215 countries and territories worldwide. To date, more than 125 million individuals have accessed OCW materials. MIT OpenCourseWare is supported by donations from site visitors, grants and corporate sponsorship, including underwriting from our Next Decade Alliance sponsors Dow Chemical, Lockheed Martin and MathWorks.

About John Gabrieli

John Gabrieli is the director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the McGovern Institute. He is an Investigator at the Institute, with faculty appointments in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, where is holds the Grover Hermann Professorship. He also co-directs the MIT Clinical Research Center and is Associate Director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH/MIT, located at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior joining MIT, he spent 14 years at Stanford University in the Department of Psychology and Neurosciences Program. Since 1990, he has served as Visiting Professor, Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Hospital and Rush Medical College. He received a Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience in the MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences in 1987 and B.A. in English from Yale University in 1978.

About the Stanton Foundation

The Stanton Foundation was created by Frank Stanton, who is widely regarded as one of the greatest executives in the history of electronic communications. During his 25 years as president of CBS, he turned a lesser-known radio network into a broadcasting powerhouse. Stanton made many historic contributions to the industry and to the society it served. In 1960, he initiated the first televised presidential debates—the famous Nixon-Kennedy “Great Debates”—which required a special Act of Congress before they could proceed. He also spearheaded the creation of the first coast-to-coast broadcasting system, allowing CBS to become the first network to present a news event live across the continental United States, a speech by President Truman at the opening of the Japanese Peace Conference in San Francisco. Frank Stanton was the commencement speaker at MIT in 1961.

Contact:

Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu
http://ocw.mit.edu

OCW Consortium announces 2012 winners of site Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence

Posted in Open Educational Resources, OpenCourseWare, OpenCourseWare Consortium by scarsonmsm on March 29, 2012

Course awards to be announced at the annual Meeting of the OpenCourseWare Consortium on April 16.

CAMBRIDGE, MA, March 29, 2012 — The OpenCourseWare Consortium has announced the 2012 winners of site Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE).

The 2012 Outstanding New Site Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence, awarded to a site launched in the previous calendar year, has been given to the Virtual University of Pakistan OpenCourseWare site. The site includes 138 undergraduate and graduate courses and 6,000 hours of video.

National Chiao Tung University OpenCourseWare is the 2012 recipient of the Landmark Site Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence, which is conferred upon an outstanding OCW launched prior to the previous calendar year. NCTU OCW has 124 courses, including 102 with full video recordings of lectures. The site received more than 3 million visits in 2011.

The 2012 Technical Innovation Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence has been given to Smarthistory.org for outstanding presentation of humanities content. Smarthistory uses conversation and multimedia to make art history accessible and meaningful. The site employs Flickr and on-site video to re-locate artwork in its historical and contemporary contexts. More than thirty art historians, with varied specialties, have contributed to the site.

The Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence provide annual recognition to outstanding individuals, courseware and OpenCourseWare sites in the OCW Consortium community. The awards are presented each year at the global OpenCourseWare Consortium’s annual conference, to be held this year April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK. Individual award recipients are selected by the Consortium’s Board of Directors; site and course awards are selected by an awards committee populated from the Consortium membership. ACE’s for individual courses will be announced at the OCWC Conference to be held April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK.

“We’re very pleased to honor these three sites,” said OCW Consortium Executive Director Mary Lou Forward. “They are truly exemplary among the thousands and thousands of open educational resources shared by the members of the OpenCourseWare Consortium.”

The OCW Consortium Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence are sponsored by KNEXT, an education software and solutions provider that focuses on learning assessment, ePortfolio development and higher education advisory services.

About the Award Recipients

National Chiao Tung University (NCTU) OCW site was launched in June 2007, as the world’s first OCW site in Chinese run by an OCWC University member. NCTU OCW has established 124 courses, including 102 full-video courses, making it one of the OCW sites with the highest percentage of videos. In 2011 alone, according to Google Analytics, NCTU OCW had attracted 250,000 unique users with 3 million visits. Its video courses have accumulated more than 200 million views/downloads since 2009.

The Virtual University, Pakistan’s first University based completely on modern Information and Communication Technologies, was established by the Government as a public sector, not-for-profit institution with a clear mission: to provide extremely affordable world class education to aspiring students all over the country. Using free-to-air satellite television broadcasts and the Internet, the Virtual University allows students to follow its rigorous programs regardless of their physical locations. The Virtual University of Pakistan has always been committed to education for all and has, from its very inception, pursued an open policy regarding its content. The course material has been made freely available through broadcast television, DVDs and YouTube and is extensively used by students and faculty members alike from other universities, both formally and informally.To further this commitment, VU has now published all courses on its open courseware site, and thereby joined ranks with the top few universities of the world

Smarthistory.org is a free, not-for-profit, multi-media web-book designed as a dynamic enhancement (or even substitute) for the traditional art history textbook. Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker began smARThistory in 2005 by creating a blog featuring free audio guides in the form of podcasts for use in The Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Soon after, they embedded the audio files in their online survey courses. The response from their students was so positive that they decided to create a multi-media survey of art history web-book. They created audios and videos about works of art found in standard art history survey texts, organized the files stylistically and chronologically, and added text and still images.

About KNEXT

KNEXT, which is part of Kaplan, is an education software and solutions company focused on helping higher education institutions build or enhance prior learning assessment offerings and online portfolio management. By enabling individuals to translate their prior learning into college credit and track their progress through online portfolios, KNEXT helps institutions recruit engaged adult learners and increase both persistence and graduation rates. For information about KNEXT, the Learning Recognition Program, self-assessment quizzes, the PATH courses, and more, visit http://www.knext.com.

About the OpenCourseWare Consortium

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 250 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses.

Activities of the OpenCourseWare Consortium are supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, member dues, and contributions from sustaining members including: African Virtual University, China Open Resources for Education, Delft University of Technology, Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NetEase Information Technology, Open Universiteit, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Tufts University, Universia, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University of California, Irvine, University of Michigan, and University of the Western Cape.

Contact:
Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu
http://ocw.mit.edu

MIT Professor Shigeru Miyagawa named award recipient by the OCW Consortium

Professor Miyagawa recognized with other leaders of the global OpenCourseWare movement.

Shigeru Miyagawa

Professor Miyagawa

CAMBRIDGE, MA, March 22, 2012 — MIT Linguistics professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been selected to receive the President’s Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE) for his contributions to the global OpenCourseWare and Open Education movements. Professor Miyagawa has been a key member of the faculty team that has nurtured the development of MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW), has contributed a significant amount of his own course materials to the site, and has traveled extensively to spread the practice of openly sharing educational materials globally.

“I am honored and deeply humbled by this recognition,” remarked Professor Miyagawa. “MIT OpenCourseWare and the many other projects around the world are the result of the generosity of thousands of educators who have shared their teaching materials, and all deserve to be recognized. I am glad to have helped to make this sharing possible.”

Professor Miyagawa, who holds the endowed Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture chair, served on the committee that proposed MIT OpenCourseWare in the year 2000. Since the program’s inception, he has been a member of the MIT OpenCourseWare Faculty Advisory Committee, and he currently serves as chair of that body.

When OCW published its proof-of-concept site in the fall of 2002, Professor Miyagawa contributed materials from two courses, CMS.930 Media, Education and the Marketplace and 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language. In the following year he contributed materials from 24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax and 21F.027 Visualizing Cultures, one of the richest and most visually engaging of MIT OpenCourseWare’s offerings.

Professor Miyagawa has also been a tireless advocate for the global OpenCourseWare movement. In 2005, he provided assistance to six of Japan’s top universities in forming the Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, which has since grown to include 24 Japanese universities and 20 associated organizations. In support of the global movement, Professor Miyagawa has traveled to locations including Cameroon, Korea, Portugal, Israel, Taiwan, and Zambia to advocate to for the creation of OpenCourseWare programs at universities around the world.

Honored with Professor Miyagawa by the OCW Consortium are Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan from University of California, Irvine and José Vida Fernández of University Carlos III of Madrid. Chair for the Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention, Program in Public Health, Dr. Ogunseitan is the recipient of the OpenCourseWare Consortium’s Leadership ACE for his role in building the prominence of the UCI OCW site within that institution. Professor for the Department of Public Law and Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III, Dr. Vida has been awarded the Educator Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence in recognition of the outstanding body of content he has published through that university’s OCW site.

The Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence provide annual recognition to outstanding individuals, courseware and OpenCourseWare sites in the OCW Consortium community. The awards are presented each year at the global OpenCourseWare Consortium’s annual conference, to be held this year April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK. The Consortium’s Board of Directors selects individual award recipients; an awards committee populated from the Consortium membership selects site and course awards. The Educator ACE was previously given to MIT physics professor Walter Lewin in 2011.

“We’re very pleased to honor these three individuals,” said OCW Consortium Executive Director Mary Lou Forward. “Each of these recipients embodies the commitment widely shared throughout the OCW community, and each has made a remarkable contribution.”

The OCW Consortium Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence are sponsored by KNEXT, an education software and solutions provider that focuses on learning assessment, ePortfolio development and higher education advisory services.

About the Award Recipients

Professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been at MIT since 1991, where he is Professor of Linguistics and holds the endowed chair, Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture. In linguistics, he has published numerous books and monographs, and has nearly fifty articles on syntax, argument structure, and East Asian and Altaic linguistics. He also runs a laboratory that creates interactive educational programs. JP NET, which has the entire MIT Japanese program on the web, was one of the first online projects in the world to place an entire academic program on the Internet (1993-1994). Visualizing Cultures, in collaboration with the Pulitzer Prize historian John W. Dower, has been recognized by the National Endowment for the Humanities as an outstanding humanities educational website. He was on the original team that proposed OpenCourseWare, and has helped to start opencoursewares in Japan and elsewhere. He serves on the MIT OpenCourseWare Advisory Board. Miyagawa received his Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Arizona in 1980, and his B.A. from the International Christian University in Tokyo in 1975.

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan is professor of public health and founding Chair of the department of Population Health and Disease Prevention at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also professor of Social Ecology. Since 2009, he has served as the Co-Director of the UC Irvine Framework Program in Global Health funded by the National Institutes of Health’s John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences. He is the Director of Research Education, Training and Career Development for the NIH- funded Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He is a member of the steering committee for the UC Irvine Environment Institute and he serves on the executive committee for the Urban Water Research Center. He earned his doctorate in microbiology at the university of Tennessee, and his Master of Public Health at the university of California, Berkeley, where he also earned a certificate in International Health. He is the author of Microbial Diversity (Blackwell-Wiley, 2005) and editor of Green Health (Sage, 2011).

Professor José Vida Fernández graduated magna cum laude from University of Granada (Spain). He is also European PhD from the University of Bologna (Italy). He is a noted legal scholar on telecommunications law, health care law, poverty and welfare state. Vida teaches administrative law at the University Carlos III of Madrid and has lectured abroad (US, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Perú). He is Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III and fellow of the Institute Pascual Madoz (University Carlos III) and Residential Scholar at the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study. Prof. Vida has broad research experience as director of public and private funded projects. He has also received awards from Spanish and international organizations for innovative teaching projects and OpenCourseWare publications (University Carlos III, 2007; Universia, 2010; OCW Consortium, 2011).

About KNEXT

KNEXT, which is part of Kaplan, is an education software and solutions company focused on helping higher education institutions build or enhance prior learning assessment offerings and online portfolio management. By enabling individuals to translate their prior learning into college credit and track their progress through online portfolios, KNEXT helps institutions recruit engaged adult learners and increase both persistence and graduation rates. For information about KNEXT, the Learning Recognition Program, self-assessment quizzes, the PATH courses, and more, visit http://www.knext.com.

About the OpenCourseWare Consortium

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 250 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses.

Activities of the OpenCourseWare Consortium are supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, member dues, and contributions from sustaining members including: African Virtual University, China Open Resources for Education, Delft University of Technology, Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NetEase Information Technology, Open Universiteit, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Tufts University, Universia, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University of California, Irvine, University of Michigan, and University of the Western Cape.

Contact:
Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu
http://ocw.mit.edu

OCW Consortium announces 2012 winners of individual Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence

Individual awards announced; site and course awards to follow.

CAMBRIDGE, MA, March 22, 2012 — The OpenCourseWare Consortium has announced the 2012 winners of individual Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence (ACE).

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan, University of California, Irvine Professor and Chair for the Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention, Program in Public Health, is the recipient of this year’s Leadership ACE for his role in building the prominence of the UCI OCW site within that institution.

José Vida Fernández, University Carlos III of Madrid Professor for the Department of Public Law and Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III, is the 2012 recipient of the Educator ACE in recognition of the outstanding body of content he has published through that university’s OCW site.

MIT professor Shigeru Miyagawa has been awarded the President’s Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence for his leadership in developing MIT OpenCourseWare and his pivotal role in fostering the growth of OCW in Japan and around the world.

The Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence provide annual recognition to outstanding individuals, courseware and OpenCourseWare sites in the OCW Consortium community. The awards are presented each year at the global OpenCourseWare Consortium’s annual conference, to be held this year April 16-18 in Cambridge, UK. The Consortium’s Board of Directors selects individual award recipients; an awards committee populated from the Consortium membership selects site and course awards. Site ACE’s will be announced later in March and ACE’s for individual courses will be announced at the OCWC Conference.

“We’re very pleased to honor these three individuals,” said OCW Consortium Executive Director Mary Lou Forward. “Each of these recipients embodies the commitment widely shared throughout the OCW community, and each has made a remarkable contribution.”

The OCW Consortium Awards for OpenCourseWare Excellence are sponsored by KNEXT, an education software and solutions provider that focuses on learning assessment, ePortfolio development and higher education advisory services.

About the Award Recipients

Dr. Oladele Ogunseitan is professor of public health and founding Chair of the department of Population Health and Disease Prevention at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also professor of Social Ecology. Since 2009, he has served as the Co-Director of the UC Irvine Framework Program in Global Health funded by the National Institutes of Health’s John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences. He is the Director of Research Education, Training and Career Development for the NIH- funded Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He is a member of the steering committee for the UC Irvine Environment Institute and he serves on the executive committee for the Urban Water Research Center. He earned his doctorate in microbiology at the university of Tennessee, and his Master of Public Health at the university of California, Berkeley, where he also earned a certificate in International Health. He is the author of Microbial Diversity (Blackwell-Wiley, 2005) and editor of Green Health (Sage, 2011).

Professor José Vida Fernández
graduated magna cum laude from University of Granada (Spain). He is also European PhD from the University of Bologna (Italy). He is a noted legal scholar on telecommunications law, health care law, poverty and welfare state. Vida teaches administrative law at the University Carlos III of Madrid, and has lectured abroad (US, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Perú). He is Deputy Director of the Telecommunications Law Master Program of the University Carlos III and fellow of the Institute Pascual Madoz (University Carlos III) and Residential Scholar at the Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study. Prof. Vida has broad research experience as director of public and private funded projects. He has also received awards from Spanish and international organizations for innovative teaching projects and OpenCourseWare publications (University Carlos III, 2007; Universia, 2010; OCW Consortium, 2011).

Shigeru Miyagawa has been at MIT since 1991, where he is Professor of Linguistics and holds the endowed chair, Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture. In linguistics, he has published numerous books and monographs, and has nearly fifty articles on syntax, argument structure, and East Asian and Altaic linguistics. He also runs a laboratory that creates interactive educational programs. JP NET, which has the entire MIT Japanese program on the web, was one of the first online projects in the world to place an entire academic program on the Internet (1993-1994). Visualizing Cultures, in collaboration with the Pulitzer Prize historian John W. Dower, has been recognized by the National Endowment for the Humanities as an outstanding humanities educational website. He was on the original team that proposed OpenCourseWare, and has helped to start opencoursewares in Japan and elsewhere. He serves on the MIT OpenCourseWare Advisory Board. Miyagawa received his Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Arizona in 1980, and his B.A. from the International Christian University in Tokyo in 1975.

About KNEXT

KNEXT, which is part of Kaplan, is an education software and solutions company focused on helping higher education institutions build or enhance prior learning assessment offerings and online portfolio management. By enabling individuals to translate their prior learning into college credit and track their progress through online portfolios, KNEXT helps institutions recruit engaged adult learners and increase both persistence and graduation rates. For information about KNEXT, the Learning Recognition Program, self-assessment quizzes, the PATH courses, and more, visit http://www.knext.com.

About the OpenCourseWare Consortium

The OpenCourseWare Consortium is a collaboration of more than 250 higher education institutions and associated organizations from around the world creating a broad and deep body of open educational content using a shared model. The mission of the OpenCourseWare Consortium is to advance formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses.

Activities of the OpenCourseWare Consortium are supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, member dues, and contributions from sustaining members including: African Virtual University, China Open Resources for Education, Delft University of Technology, Japan OpenCourseWare Consortium, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Korea OpenCourseWare Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NetEase Information Technology, Open Universiteit, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Tufts University, Universia, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, University of California, Irvine, University of Michigan, and University of the Western Cape.

Contact:
Stephen Carson
External Relations Director
MIT OpenCourseWare
617-253-1250
scarson@mit.edu
http://ocw.mit.edu

Lies, damn lies and…

…new statistics.

Just completed the 2011 evaluation summary.  Hope as always to follow with a more detailed report, but for now, this gives a general idea of directions and trends.

Most interesting thing in here for me is the increase in % of students (up to 45% from 42%), making them now the largest constituency instead of self learners (at 42% down from 43%).  These are margin-of-error-ish changes, but interesting nonetheless.  Could be a result of the time of year we did the survey, could indicate more people returning to school in a tough economy–lots of possible explanations.

Also interesting that the primary student use is now complementing materials from an enrolled course  (up to 45% from 39%) instead of learning outside the scope of formally enrolled coursework (down from 44% to 40%).  This may indicate that more students are coming from undergraduate and community colleges, as this lines up more with past measures of usage scenarios at that level, but I’ll have to dig deeper to see if that holds.

Dig in yourself, and feel free to ask questions!

Asia rising in the OCW world

At the Asian OCW/Open Education Regional Conference (AROOC) 2011.  It’s clear that Asia is moving into the fore of OCW publication.  OCW in Asia is more widespread than anywhere else in the world, with 213 institutions sharing more than 3,500 courses.

Members of the Japan OCW Consortium and participants in the Korea OCW program have each published more than 1,000 courses each, and members of the Taiwan OCW Consortium have published around 450 courses, three quarters of which include video lectures.

Even more impressive is the way that these univerisites are beginning to leverage the open content they’ve created to reimagine how they provide campus-based education, experimenting with inverted classrooms, tuition reduction, and student generation of content.

This information is drawn from presentations that will be available via streaming media soon.  I’ll post a link when I have it.

View the last Awards for OCW Excellence